Sozo and Shabar

Quite frequently in my blog posts, you’ll hear me talking about Sozo ministry. Occasionally, I’ll talk about Shabar as well. Sozo is a Greek word meaning “Healed, Saved, and Delivered.” Shabar is Hebrew for “Brokenhearted.”

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Started in Bethel Church, Sozo is a deliverance ministry based on a lot of forgiveness. The leader of the Sozo session will use learned tools and direction from Holy Spirit to facilitate a conversation between whomever is receiving the Sozo, and God Himself.

One of our teams in Olympia developed a tool we refer to as Sozo Plus, an exercise that isn’t included in a normal sozo. Before, we would jump right into trying to get the sozo-ee to talk to Father God, something that most people find intimidating and even impossible!

Now, we start out the Sozo by telling the Sozo-ee to close his or her eyes and picture an apple; once they see the apple, they are to picture taking a big bite out of it. Then you have them open their eyes and describe the experience. How big was the apple? What color? Was it crisp or mushy, mealy or watery, or juicy? Sweet, sour, bitter or bland?

What they don’t realize is that they’re hearing from Holy Spirit, even then! The apple represents the quality of their life. If the apple is big, shiny, red and crisp and sweet, then they are at a really good season in their life right now where they can enjoy the fruit of their own sweetness and characteristics. Sometimes, the apple will be mealy or watery, which simply means that God wants to either add some doctrine (water) or experiential substance (more ‘meat’ in the apple).

Next, you have your sozo-ee picture a dog. The dog represents Jesus. You have them pay close attention to what the dog’s attitude is, how they feel about the dog, whether he’s excited or calm, and how close they are in relation to him. Typically at the beginning of a Sozo, the dog will be really excited, jumping up and down and wagging his tail. This is Jesus saying, “I want to be close to you! I just want to be your friend! Let me in!” The marvelous thing that typically happens by the end of a Sozo is that when you take them back to the scene with the dog, he is right up close against them, happy and calm—which signifies that the person and Jesus had an encounter, and now Jesus is content with their friendship.

The third thing you have the sozo-ee picture, is a bird—which, of course, represents Holy Spirit. It’s so exciting, what different people see! Some people see robins that turn into eagles, eagles that turn into bluebirds, seagulls, or doves. The most common thing they see is that the bird is far off, flying, not making a sound. This usually means that they don’t really have much of a relationship with Holy Spirit, that He’s just some distant, intangible spirit that we can’t grab ahold of.

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By the time you introduce the sozo-ee to the apple, dog, and bird, they have been fully plugged into Holy Spirit by their imagination. Before this exercise was revealed to a Sozo team by Holy Spirit, Sozo ministers had a difficult time getting past the lie so many people believe of, “I can’t hear God,” or “I can’t see Him,” or even, “I can’t feel Him.” Holy Spirit starts speaking to the person in your session the moment it begins, just because of your intent and the anointing on you.

You begin the Sozo session by having Holy Spirit take the person to a safe place. This is done simply by having them repeat after you, “Holy Spirit, will you take me to a safe place?” This can be a bedroom, a favorite vacation spot, or even someplace imaginary that they have never seen before. From there, you have them invite Father God, Jesus, and Holy Spirit into their safe place one by one.

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Here’s the funny thing about relationships: Our relationships with the Godhead will always be reflected by our relationships with people in our lives. For example, how we see Father God will either be enhanced or distorted by our relationship with our birth father. How we see Jesus is influenced by our relationships with our siblings, cousins, friends, or spouse. How we see Holy Spirit is a reflection of our relationship with our birth mother.

So when a sozo-ee asks Father God to join them, and Father God makes Himself evident as the sun in the sky in their safe place, it’s usually indicative that their birth father was very distant, lofty-thinking, much smarter than they were, et cetera. So from there, you lead the person into asking, “Father God, is there anything I need to forgive my father for?” Holy Spirit will tell them Yes or No, and if the answer is Yes, you have them ask, “What is it?” He will tell them, show them a memory they need to forgive, and they forgive it, renounce a lie about God that resulted from that incident, and then they get to receive their healing and a special gift from Father God.

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You repeat this process with Jesus and Holy Spirit for as long as there is time (Sozo sessions generally go about 2 hours).

There are several other tools to Sozo that I will likely talk about in a later post, but this is enough background for now. It’s amazing how much healing people get with just that!

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Shabar Ministry is a form of Advanced Sozo. If a person can’t see Father God, Jesus, or Holy Spirit—if you are coming up against what feels like a brick wall, and can’t get any ground—chances are, you need to move into Shabar.

The concept of Shabar is that oftentimes, when we are children, if we experience a trauma that we aren’t meant to handle or understand, a coping mechanism like a spare tire comes out and allows that child to function and keep going. But if the issue of the trauma isn’t addressed and the child doesn’t receive healing, that spare tire will stay out even as the child grows older. How many of you know that a car doesn’t run well on a spare tire for extended periods of time? So often, the people around us are running on a spare tire from a childhood trauma that they don’t know how to get rid of.

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An extreme form of this that is easiest to understand is the concept of schizophrenia, or multiple personality disorder, or various forms of bipolar/mania. I dealt with this with my husband back when we were dating (and this was before I knew any kind of Sozo or Shabar Ministry, so I had no idea how to handle it).

What happened with Levi was that, as a result of the traumas that had occurred in his life (being forcefully separated from his mom at birth, and his parents divorcing two years later), a part of his spirit was literally fractured. Part of him was able to grow and mature and develop at the normal rate a child should, but there was a part of him that stayed at that level of a very small, very frightened child. There would be times that seemed random, where the smallest and most insignificant things (to me) would trigger these enormous breakdowns. The Levi I knew vanished and I had no idea how to get him back. In his place was a terrified little boy who didn’t know how to handle the grown-up world around him in his grown-up body.

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When someone in Sozo is unable to progress in seeing God, or if they start manifesting (like the trigger I mentioned above) during a session, you guide them back to a safe place and you start speaking to the child that’s broken inside them. You have them ask, “Father God, is there a little girl/boy you want to heal?” Holy Spirit will tell them Yes or No, and if it’s Yes, then they ask, “Father God, show me the little girl/boy.” You have the sozo-ee pay special attention to what the little girl or boy is wearing, what they are doing, how they feel, et cetera.

Typically, the first question you have them ask beyond that is, “Father God, what does the little girl/boy need?” Or you could go a roundabout way and say, “Father God, how does the little girl/boy feel about you?” But eventually you get to the point where you have them ask Father God what the child needs, and if the child would be okay with Father God coming near to give them what they need. Tremendous healing happens as a result of this—the testimonies are endless, but no words can describe what happens in these sessions.

So, there you have it. A little (and I do mean little) background on the Sozo and Shabar ministry that I am privileged to be a part of. Hopefully this will give you some good context for what I reference in my posts, and I’m always open to answering questions about it.

God’s Will, or God’s Won’t?

Last Sunday, our pastor challenged us to ponder a question over the week.

The question at hand: Is everything that God allows to happen, His will?

First of all, my answer is a resolute no.

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I’ll break up the explanation for my answer in a few categories: death, healing, offenses, and free will.

Death
God has given us a good 80-some years to live our lives. Some people make it past 100. I personally believe that the only “Natural cause” for death should be having lived a full life and leaving this earth sometime between 80 and 100 years—not of cancer, pneumonia, injury, or any other disease or pain. I refuse to believe that God’s primary instruments for passing man from here to eternity are instruments of pain and destruction of body or mind.

Last year, I watched my grandma pace helplessly as her mother, hundreds of miles away in Texas, lay dying. My great-grandma Callaway had lived a full life in graciousness and extravagant generosity, yet now her strength, as well as her mind, was failing her. I don’t remember exactly what she had, but I think it was Alzheimer’s that was now sapping her mind of sanity.

Every day, my grandma called her sister in Texas, asking for a report. My heart broke as she absorbed the blow of news of her mother’s rapidly worsening condition. My great-grandmother was waking up in her hospital room disoriented and confused, often in tears as she tried to sort out what was happening to her. Once, the nurses found her huddled on the floor, clutching a teddy bear to her chest.

My grandma put up a wonderful charade of strength for our family over that Christmas and New Year’s Eve, though it was evident her mind was elsewhere. Her usually festive Christmas decorations were absent, and there was a stale atmosphere of false cheerfulness over the holiday. My dad, my aunt and uncle, my grandpa and I all did the best we could to support my grandma, but for the most part, words failed. What encouragement can you offer to someone whose parent is being robbed by disease?

My grandma, through her grief, resigned herself to believe that God must have decided it was time for her mother to pass into Heaven and this was His way of doing it. The injustice of this rubbed me very wrong. A year-old Christian at the time, I was offended in my heart at the idea that it was God’s will for my great-grandma to die this way. I was fine with thinking that her time was up on earth; but I refused to even consider that God intended for her to die in the pain and confusion the disease was causing her.

I don’t have a seminary degree, nor a lifetime of Bible studying beneath my belt. But what I had learned of the Godhead in my short time in His presence was that He is gracious, merciful, kind, loving, and the giver of all good gifts (James 1:5). And I knew that sickness, disease, and death were the fruit of the prince of this world (John 14:30). I also knew that Jesus had said it is not the Father’s will that any should perish, but that all should have everlasting life (Matthew 18:14).

This isn’t a dictionary definition by any means, but when I think of the word “perish,” I think of an early, unnatural death. I think of the grief left in the anticipation and wake of these deaths. The  actual dictionary definition of the word “perish” is ” To die or be destroyed, especially in a violent or untimely manner.” If we put this with 2 Peter 3:9, it says “But He bears patiently with you, His desire being that none should die or be destroyed in a violent or untimely manner, but that all should come to repentance” (emphasis added). As humans being mortal, we all die. Our spirits are eternal, but the houses they live in are “but a breath.”

If it was God’s will to inflict someone—to inflict a strong, faithful Christian—with a disease to kill them off, wouldn’t that be contradictory to His nature? The Bible says that God and satan cannot walk hand in hand, and throughout the Old Testament, God demonstrates His inability to even tolerate, much less partner with, sin.

In tears, I went to God. My spirit was in complete turmoil. “If what my grandma is saying is true,” I thought, “This changes everything I thought I knew about You.”

In Jeremiah 29:11, one of the most familiar Bible verses quoted and memorized by the Church, God says “For I know the plans I have for you, plans to prosper and not to harm you. Plans to give you a future and a hope.” Why would a God with a plan for your life, for a future and a hope, will for you to die before you have that future? When He said that to Jeremiah, He was speaking it into eternity for all who accept it. Even Paul said, “For even if it was written in the Scriptures long ago, you can be sure it was meant for us.” (Romans 15:4)

This is not a conditional promise. This is for everyone. This is a proclamation that spans generations and denominations. We know that God has a plan for every single one of us.

When I was 16, a friend in my class overdosed and killed himself. When I was 18, a slew of students from North Thurston High School were killed in several auto accidents, all within the span of a week. I have known several women who have miscarried and lost their children—some of them lost their faith in those seasons also, because someone told them it was God’s will, or that they didn’t have enough faith to change the course of events that had happened.

My grandma on my mom’s side died in a house fire when my mom was 10 years old. Last week would have been my grandma’s 74th birthday. My mom struggled through the rest of her childhood, adolescence, and early adulthood. An orphan in spirit and in the natural (my grandpa, her dad, was alive but absent throughout her life), my mom remains fractured and brokenhearted. I feel the void in her heart that only a mother or an act of God could fill.

You can’t tell me that it was God’s will for my grandma to be killed when my mother was a child. If God’s heart is to comfort orphans and restore them to wholeness, why would He create more of them by killing off more parents? It’s not His nature. Though God is bigger than circumstance and tragedy—He can and does use every terrible thing in our lives for His glory and our healing—He doesn’t need to create a setup of pain just so He can swoop in and save the day.

Can you imagine, if a superhero went around the city causing disasters just so He could come and rescue the citizens, put out the fires, and take the cats out of the trees? The citizens of the city would become his pawns, and his integrity as a hero and savior would be compromised.

On a less anecdotal and more Biblical note, let’s talk about dead raising. If everybody who died short of their 80-some years died of causes that were God’s will, then why was Jesus going around raising the dead? If Jesus went about during His years of ministry, healing the sick, raising the dead, and casting out demons–all against God’s will–then He was the biggest rebel against His Father that history has ever witnessed!

Why would God give us the power, and Jesus give us the command, to raise the dead unless it isn’t God’s will that everyone die when they do? Even in the Old Testament, prophets raised people from the dead. Under Old Covenant, even without the instructions of Jesus Christ telling us to heal the sick, raise the dead and cast out demons! And this was back in the day where if someone accessed or witnessed the glory of God outside of His will, they were killed—such as when when the Israelites were moving the Ark of the Covenant back to Jerusalem, and someone was killed because they reached out to steady it from falling.

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Along the same lines is the topic of Healing. We are instructed to lay hands on each other and pray for healing. We are given numerous promises throughout the New Testament that if we pray for something, it will be given. Jesus healed all the sick in Nazareth and in other cities He ministered in. How are we to do any less?

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My third point is on Offenses.

Sometimes, we pray for something to happen—or not to happen—and they happen anyway. Is it God’s will? Not always.

When I was 15, I had my first boyfriend. He was a Christian, but he was also a teenage boy in his first relationship. I was not a Christian, and I had so many issues with rejection and self-esteem that I was starving for any and all affection he would give me. I placed my desire to be loved above my values to stay pure and save myself until marriage. Our relationship quickly grew physical, and I fell more in “Love” with this boy the more we fooled around. Suddenly, he broke our relationship off, saying he had lost interest—when in fact the opposite was true; God had convicted him of our relationship being lust-oriented, and he was desperate for a way out before we lost our virginity entirely.

Heartbroken, I swore myself away from dating. A year later, God encountered me in my brokenness and I accepted Him as my father. Our relationship didn’t progress beyond that, and I did nothing more than write in a prayer journal and receive comfort from Him. I didn’t attend church and I refused to open my Bible. But I prayed.

A few months later, after my ex boyfriend and I rekindled a sincere, platonic friendship, he invited me over to his house for a few movies. He assured me that his parents would be there at the house. I was immediately afraid that something would happen if I went, but I was afraid of telling him no…so I said yes. While I waited for him to come pick me up from the house, I broke down before the Lord and I prayed that nothing would happen. I prayed that He would protect me and keep me safe, that He would give me the courage to say no, to leave the house, to get away from the situation if the boy tried to instigate anything. But at the end of my prayer, I made a promise: “Whatever happens, I will still love You.”

It turned out that his parents were not home after all. You can guess what happened. Violated and ashamed, and taking the blame completely for everything that had happened (after all, I hadn’t been able to reach my voice to tell him no; how could it not be my fault?), I told no one but my best friend for months. And I kept my promise to God. I still loved Him and I didn’t hold Him responsible for not answering my prayer. Though I was confused and didn’t understand why He would have allowed this to happen, I didn’t let my heart be offended. I needed Him too much.

Was it God’s will that I was humiliated in this way? What about all other rape victims? What about the girls and boys across the world who are stolen from their families and sold into slavery, trafficked across country and state borders, smuggled even into our own country? Is that God’s will? No.

Many people who call themselves atheists, agnostics, or polytheistic use the situations I have previously mentioned to spearhead their argument against God being gracious, sovereign, loving, and all the other qualities we know to be true about Him. A favorite target against God is the issue of world hunger and poverty, that there are hundreds of thousands of children dying due to starvation or no access to clean water. Then there’s the Holocaust, and the millions killed in wars throughout history. How do you explain those away?

To be sure, these are all questions that are meant to challenge our faith—and we should ask them! We are encouraged to ask the Holy Spirit all of our questions, and who better to ask than God Almighty, Omniscient, and Faithful? He is honest and true, and He is eager to answer our questions because if we are asking things of Him it means we are seeking His face. I would like to add as a sidenote, however, that there is a very distinct difference between seeking His face on an issue and demanding something of Him with arms crossed.

In Genesis, when God informs Abraham of His intentions to destroy the cities of Sodom and Gomorrah, Abraham does not stand away from God, offended in his heart—nor does he slump his shoulders resolutely and state that all this is simply God’s will. Rather, he invites the discussion as fruit from intimacy with God. The Word says that Abraham came closer to the Lord: Abraham approached Him and said, “Will you sweep away both the righteous and the wicked? Suppose you find fifty righteous people living…” (Genesis 18:23) The discussion goes on for several verses, down until God promising that if He finds even one righteous man in the wicked cities, that He would not destroy them.

In Exodus, when Moses was leading the Israelites out of Egypt and through the Wilderness to the Promised Land, the Israelites forgot God and began to worship idols crafted of gold. At one point, God in His anger says He will destroy the children of promise and start over with a line from Moses to inherit His blessing. Moses reminds the Lord of the promise He made to Abraham, and the Lord changes His mind.

God is moved by the supplications of a people seeking after His heart. He isn’t looking for people who know His law, for the law is not the language by which we relate to Him anymore. Now, we are free to come boldly into His presence by the blood of Jesus. Now, we are free to make our requests of Him just as Abraham and Moses did. Now, we can take events in which God allows disaster to happen, and implore that these things be reversed, or used for good and His glory.

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Free Will

Because of Jesus, the curse placed on humanity from the beginning has been finished, and man has been given the opportunity to start over with the original blessing: be fruitful and multiply, and take dominion over all creation. Man has been re-invited to co-create with God through declaration, the laying on of hands, dreaming, imagination, and simple prayer.

But these things are all active, and we must choose to do them. We have been given the world as our land to take care of and be stewards over. Through years of selfishness and sin, we have enslaved each other, killed each other, orphaned one another, and robbed each other. The world we see today is the result of this. Poverty, third world countries, extreme greed and imbalance of wealth, and an earth that is physically groaning with the efforts of holding back its cries to glorify the Lord and be consecrated back to its original design. Proverbs 9 says that the Lord designated the boundaries of the waters of the ocean, saying that it cannot cross beyond its shores.

The Japan tsunami of March 11th, 2011 is a direct rebellion of this Word. Not that we can blame a world that has remained cursed as the result of God’s children’s refusal to rise up and take dominion of what is rightfully ours and God’s.

The reality is that we are partners with God. Though He is Sovereign, the only way He could bring justice and righteousness and peace back into our world is if He were to either kill all who are unrighteous or rob us all of our free will. And because God is a God of relationship, to do either would be a contradiction to His nature.

Earlier, I mentioned the ordeal that happened with my ex boyfriend. Months after I had been hurt, I told my mom about it. I asked her why God had let it happen. She said that though I had prayed, the boy was still a human being with free will. If God were to have been sovereign in the situation, He would have had to compromise His nature by stealing this boy’s free will. He would have had to violate this boy to keep him from hurting me, which would have been no less wrong.

Through the years following, God has healed me of this offense. I have forgiven the boy for hurting me. My marriage has helped me heal from the scars left by rejection and being taken advantage of, and dispelled all lies that I deserved what happened to me.

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Not everything that happens is God’s will. Pastor Bill Johnson explains it this way: “God is always in charge, but not necessarily in control.” Please don’t take this to mean that God doesn’t have the power to control; He does. He is Sovereign. He could step in at any moment and take control of everything. But He doesn’t, and He won’t, because we have a role to play in all of this. God has relinquished control to us as stewards of the earth. One day, He will take His place as King of all, but for now it’s up to us.

So, World Changer. Yes, you. Reading this, right now. It’s up to us. Scary? Absolutely. Impossible? Oh yes. But with God, all things are possible. If He is for us (and He is!), who can stand against us? We have been invited to participate in the grandest commissioning in history! And we have the best partner, whose yoke is easy and burden is oh so light.

Be encouraged. Whatever you’re supposed to be doing, you’re doing it. Right here, right now. You are an instrument of His purposes here on earth, and you are extending Kingdom.